Tiltrotator options for Tak TB216

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Monkeybusiness

Well-known member
I think anything other than S30 direct mount with no gripper would be overkill/too heavy/alter the geometry too much on a sub 2 tonne machine personally.
Don’t forget to allow for new buckets (you definitely need to go s-type to keep the overall profile down) but remember that those buckets won’t pin directly onto your machine if you want to take the tilty off for whatever reason, so maybe keep a couple of your old buckets for that reason.
4 hose setup is great IME, but may be prohibitive to re-plumb the digger. It might be worth considering chopping it in against a machine with 2x proportional aux lines already built in possibly?
 
GazCro

GazCro

Well-known member
I notice a guy on socials takes his tilty off on his jcb 2.6 when digging footings etc, personally I think it’s crackers spending all that and not using it!! But it kinda tells me that a steelwrist on a jcb 2.6 isn’t all that.
I notice a guy on socials takes his tilty off on his jcb 2.6 when digging footings etc, personally I think it’s crackers spending all that and not using it!! But it kinda tells me that a steelwrist on a jcb 2.6 isn’t all that.
Depends what work you're doing if you're on golf course, landscaping type work all the time for example then you'd probably be able to make proper use of a tiltrotator 90% of the time. However if you do a lot of site work footings, bulk excavation, drainage, trench work etc then you probably only need a tiltrotator 20% of the time. Considering the cost investment why wouldn't you take it off and save the wear and tear. The way i look at it when i eventually get round to buying one it'll hopefully be the only one i buy and as i renew the carrier machine I'll just fit it to the next
 
V8Druid

V8Druid

do it as well as you can,but learn to do it better
I think anything other than S30 direct mount with no gripper would be overkill/too heavy/alter the geometry too much on a sub 2 tonne machine personally.
Don’t forget to allow for new buckets (you definitely need to go s-type to keep the overall profile down) but remember that those buckets won’t pin directly onto your machine if you want to take the tilty off for whatever reason, so maybe keep a couple of your old buckets for that reason.
4 hose setup is great IME, but may be prohibitive to re-plumb the digger. It might be worth considering chopping it in against a machine with 2x proportional aux lines already built in possibly?
depending on how Keif's current single aux line is set up it would be poss to fit cetop3 set up on the machine to split his single aux line to two directional services and run 4 pipes to the tilty from there, rather than having the valve-age (cetop3s) in the tilty itself - be way too small a unit to do it i'd imagine
 
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V8Druid

V8Druid

do it as well as you can,but learn to do it better
Depends what work you're doing if you're on golf course, landscaping type work all the time for example then you'd probably be able to make proper use of a tiltrotator 90% of the time. However if you do a lot of site work footings, bulk excavation, drainage, trench work etc then you probably only need a tiltrotator 20% of the time. Considering the cost investment why wouldn't you take it off and save the wear and tear. The way i look at it when i eventually get round to buying one it'll hopefully be the only one i buy and as i renew the carrier machine I'll just fit it to the next
I only have mine on when I need its facilities .. sits on its parking plate otherwise ... I know I'm not 'working' with mine, but if I were it'd still apply TBH ... takes me 10 mins max to mount/dismount it
 
V8Druid

V8Druid

do it as well as you can,but learn to do it better
I think anything other than S30 direct mount with no gripper would be overkill/too heavy/alter the geometry too much on a sub 2 tonne machine personally.
Don’t forget to allow for new buckets (you definitely need to go s-type to keep the overall profile down) but remember that those buckets won’t pin directly onto your machine if you want to take the tilty off for whatever reason, so maybe keep a couple of your old buckets for that reason.
4 hose setup is great IME, but may be prohibitive to re-plumb the digger. It might be worth considering chopping it in against a machine with 2x proportional aux lines already built in possibly?
got to say, from the limited experience I have of 1.5 t,s ... ANYTHING other than a bucketful'd be exciting .... having 30+ Kgs of tilty on it full time'd make you a nervous wreck :unsure:
 
Hg2702

Hg2702

Active member
Not sure what the weight is of the tilting hitch I’ve got but it handles a full grader of stone at full stretch no bother , over the tracks might be a bit risk-ay but I suppose it’s all about getting to know what it’s limits are
 
Hg2702

Hg2702

Active member
I’ll be honest having tried a tilt rotator I’d love one ! Had a near perfect back filling job all week for it however the first 2 days was hard digging in pure rock, switching between a breaker ripper and 600 bucket on a small machine a tilt hitch or tilt bucket is the way to go in my opinion
 
Grahams

Grahams

Don't complain - suggest what's better
Obviously my Menzi‘s aren’t standard sub two tonne machines, but I think it depends on your work. I started with a tilting hitch, which whilst good is not comparable with a tilt rotator for really awkward work. It saves me so much time being able to use buckets sideways I would never go back, but for occasional use a tilting grader is a very good tool.
i would consider an S30 tiltrotator and a separate grab on buttons and foot peddle. Get a blade basket made to carry the grab and buckets and do away with the thumb.
 
TiltyShaun

TiltyShaun

Well-known member
Okay, I am sober, have been all day but been working.
This experience is with a Kubota Kx71-3 which is a traditional counterweight that sits at 2800kgs. I have the basic pedal control system that works proportionally off the foot pedal and will tilt and rotate at the same time. It is directly mounted and was fitted 2 years ago. I have not ever taken it off the digger. I don’t own a breaker so on the few occasions a year I need one I hire it with a digger. What first surprised me is just how different the Scandinavian type buckets are. With there longer toe them seem to picks stuff up better and also cut through the ground better than our traditional buckets. I also have a narrow trench bucket which will dig a water service trench 800mm deep 300mm wide without the Tilty being in the trench. I have a ripper tooth which has been fab at pulling concrete and also tree routes. A V shaped ditching bucket which is great around the farm.
My experience to date. Absolutely love it. To be fair I think the Tilty on this size machine actually makes it a great machine. I had a manual thumb on the machine before I had the Tilty. In reality I have only used the thumb and Tilty on a few occasions when clearing bushes and trees. You have to be careful as when you are in action you get so used to tilt and rotate that you expect the thumb to do the same! Without knowing what work you do I would wonder how much use a grab or grippers would really be.
I also have an 8ton machine which has been on the fleet since November. Still saving for the Tilty on that one. I was advised by Gunners to go for idig system before getting the 8 ton Tilty. Advice that has proved to have been very good. I rarely need a 1.5ton machine and I would think about upgrading to a bigger digger. For the record, I think the pedal system and buttons works pretty well and I would have been unable to justify the additional expense of the upgraded system.
 
D

DaveDCB

Well-known member
I do mostly groundwork’s and finishing work, I only take mine off when I have the breaker on, it gets worked so I don’t have too! Didn’t pay 15k for it to sit looking pretty 😉 like I said, I’m comparing different size setups here and they all work differently on certain size machines!

For a 1.5 t I’d run a tilt hitch, or a dedicated tilt ditcher bucket(had one on my 1.5t CAT and it was brilliant!)
 
K

Keif

Active member
Thanks for all the replies! Had a busy weekend and it looks like its going to be a hectic one at work today. I should have time to reply to each one this evening. Here is a clip of me in the woods(thick) around the house to show some of the conditions its runs in.(also yall can laugh at me lack of skills)

 
K

Keif

Active member
Absolutely sir!

The TB 216 Fred is a 1.5t machine but you're right, S30 is the way to go for the weight saving which rules Steelwrist out. The R1 and the EC02 are both very neat units, with Engcon having the slight advantage in build height and weight between them. The R1 can withstand a breaker under it whereas the Engcon cant so if that's something you use often, you would need to add a top hitch to the Engcon which again adds cost and makes a direct mount R1 a very tempting proposition.

Control system wise, for me, it all comes down to how much you intend to use the machine. And from your above post, it doesn't sound like it does a huge amount of work. I use my JCB 8026 virtually every day (literally 7 days a week) and so it was easier to justify the cost of getting a fancy control system. And it drives lovely for it but as you will know - doubles the cost!
I was a big fan (and still am in the right applications) of the pedal control system. If I was to ever fit one to my old 8015, I would go this way, purely because it doesn't get used a huge amount and the rewards by going 4 pipe or full control system just aren't there on that machine. If I ever replace it, I would be looking to get something with 4 pipes as its probably the best compromise between the 3 different systems in terms of both useability and cost. But you already own the machine and adding lines is also expensive.

I don't know how much you use the machine, but if it was less than 3 days a week of paid work, and I wanted to improve how I worked, I would get a tilting bucket made for the hitch I have (I actually started out in this way myself). See how you find that and go from there. The ability to rotate is great once you have it but is a big jump in cost and if the paid work isn't there for it, then at the end of the day we run business's and if it doesn't pay it doesn't get bought. If after a year or so you decide to go tiltrotator, the tilt bucket wont have lost much money - mine certainly didn't and people were queuing up to buy it off me. In fact, selling my old buckets and hitch paid for over 20% of my new tilty.
Thank you. That's alot of good information.
 
K

Keif

Active member
Here is a little bobcat E20Z that I fitted a Rototilt R1 running S40 so the owner could have the gripper module, on paper this set up is far too heavy for the machine but it handles it very well, this has gone for full ICS control system.

For me I think you need to get the full control system
That looks awesome and what is confusing about this stuff. A bunch of people will tell you it won't work, then the people running it say it works great...
My dealer had some concern that on my canopy machine the electronics of the full control system would be too exposed. What do you think? Is that clamshell grapple a pull a tree out of the ground grapple? Or only pick up stuff you've already knocked over/freed up?
 
K

Keif

Active member
Where are you based at?

I am in the land of salted hams, peanuts and rednecks so it would be quite a trip, but I would love there contact info so I could chat with them about the set up!

There is a guy near london somewhere running an R1 on a tb216. I can get his details for you.
I am a Rototilt Dealer. There are a few things to watch for when fitting a tiltrotator to a Tb216. One is that the hammer valve is linkage operated meaning that you wont be able to fit a proportional control system. A factory option may be available from Takeuchi but I'm not sure.
There are second and third aux valves in the parts diagram, but I don't know if they are linkage or electric controlled. I post of picture and maybe you can tell.

A TLE system is a 4 hose system meaning the machine will need 2 aux circuits.
Right now if just have two lines lines going to the hydraulic thumb, does that mean I can only use the TE control system?

The Rototilt gripper is not very heavy on an S40 36kg. Meaning the whole unit about 140kg depending on spec.
One option I often offer is S30 and a little grab. It lowers the weight of the unit to about 105kg and means its lighter when using a bucket. Yes you have to attach the grab each time .... but it is a lighter option.... and cheaper also.

Feel free to ask me any questions also.

I'm based in Ireland and work Very closely with the UK guys👍

Aiden
Thanks for the reply! I responded as best as I could in bold.
 
K

Keif

Active member
so you have one Aux circuit? .... how is it controlled ??

you're gonna fit right in here with that sense of humor Keif ...... welcome Boyo
Right now I have the one aux circuit that is controlled by the left foot pedal. I'm not sure if I would be better off using electrics to switch the left pedal from rotate/tilt....or run a second set of lines and use electrics to switch the right pedal from boom swing/rotate. Then I could rotate and tilt at the same time......
 
K

Keif

Active member
Firstly i'm not a tiltrotator hater by any means, in fact when funds allow its something I'm going to invest in myself. But personally on anything under 2 ton the extra weight and build height effect on bucket geometry, I can only see it being any use for landscaping shaping grading works not any form of hard digging work. I'd go with tilt ditcher cheapest and easiest option (even harford tilt hitch would lose a lot of bucket tearout). If you were to go direct mount with a tilty you wouldn't be able to do any trench work deeper than your bucket unless it was as wide as the hitch either. If a tiltrotator is something you've got your heart set on look into a bigger machine (3 ton class upwards) so you can make full use of the investment would be my advice.
Thanks you for the response, this is a tough decision.
 
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