Low loaders

S

Smiffy

Well-known member
Don’t forget the implied load on the tractor - it can be upto 3 tonnes I think? I’ve got a similar twin axle low-loader trailer that is apparently 19 tonne capacity - part of the 19 tonnes includes the hitch loading. I’ll take a pic of the plate later if I remember.

That's design weight isn't it as apposed to legal weight
One of the 26t lorrys I drove has 12t axles and a 10t axle but still only 26t mlw
Tractor trailers have a legal max of 18t
And as druid said weight to far forward
Trouble with Agri kit is there seems to be a lack of thought go into it
It's just an ever bigger version of what went behind a 135

And I think some of the problem is farmers not having driven lorrys
I thought tractors and trailers where fine until doing my class 1
Now having driven lorrys I realize just how rubbish Agri stuff is on the road
Yes it gets the job done but there are definitely better ways of doing it
And tbh there are better trailers for tractors than we have in the UK
A European style turntable trailer for the size machine with 4 comercial axles would be alot better
 
M

Monkeybusiness

Well-known member
That's design weight isn't it as apposed to legal weight
One of the 26t lorrys I drove has 12t axles and a 10t axle but still only 26t mlw
Tractor trailers have a legal max of 18t
And as druid said weight to far forward
Trouble with Agri kit is there seems to be a lack of thought go into it
It's just an ever bigger version of what went behind a 135

And I think some of the problem is farmers not having driven lorrys
I thought tractors and trailers where fine until doing my class 1
Now having driven lorrys I realize just how rubbish Agri stuff is on the road
Yes it gets the job done but there are definitely better ways of doing it
And tbh there are better trailers for tractors than we have in the UK
A European style turntable trailer for the size machine with 4 comercial axles would be alot better
Dragging anything heavy behind a tractor without any weight on the tractor itself is no fun at all if you need to go up any hills - all correctly loaded agri trailers should put weight through the hitch.
Tractors have evolved massively but their legal towing weights have remained relatively low. Something as pictured above (if well maintained) is operating well within its limits and doesn't pose any particularly great risk to other road users etc (providing the load is secured properly of course!).
I’m not debating that lorries are night-and-day better at road haulage though - of course they are. They are useless at getting kit away from decent roads though (particularly when lorry-gays nail all manner of shiny s**t onto their trucks to attract other lorry-park-doggers),and can’t often be used to undertaken other work on site.
I don’t have a problem with tractors being used for haulage under certain circumstances and personally believe they are a huge false economy if used for haulage from a cost-saving perspective (second hand wagons are cheaper than a set of tractor tyres, and tractor tyres wear FAST on the road for one thing).
 
Lancs Lad

Lancs Lad

Well-known member
Isn't the while thing about mindset?
As in "wagons are complex to run and require loads of paperwork" where as run your tractor from a farm...run on red and that's it no hassle etc mentality? That's what prevails round here... 🤷
 
C

craig

Active member
I’ve got a similar twin axle low-loader trailer that is apparently 19 tonne capacity - part of the 19 tonnes includes the hitch loading. I’ll take a pic of the plate later if I remember.
Yeah, 2x 8 tonne axles and 3 tonnes on the tractor.
98AA082C-A1D0-4768-8E0D-883FB4D32E1D.jpeg
15 tonne capacity.
19t gross, less 4t of the trailer.
A js145 + hitch + buckets(s) would be tight.
 
S

Smiffy

Well-known member
Dragging anything heavy behind a tractor without any weight on the tractor itself is no fun at all if you need to go up any hills - all correctly loaded agri trailers should put weight through the hitch.
Tractors have evolved massively but their legal towing weights have remained relatively low. Something as pictured above (if well maintained) is operating well within its limits and doesn't pose any particularly great risk to other road users etc (providing the load is secured properly of course!).
I’m not debating that lorries are night-and-day better at road haulage though - of course they are. They are useless at getting kit away from decent roads though (particularly when lorry-gays nail all manner of shiny s**t onto their trucks to attract other lorry-park-doggers),and can’t often be used to undertaken other work on site.
I don’t have a problem with tractors being used for haulage under certain circumstances and personally believe they are a huge false economy if used for haulage from a cost-saving perspective (second hand wagons are cheaper than a set of tractor tyres, and tractor tyres wear FAST on the road for one thing).

I spent several years towing a dolly trailer all over south east hauling straw and I would a thousand times rather have a dolly trailer than a conventional trailer with big loads
They brake so much better
Also those newhollands have particularly poor rear brakes they only use one disk per side with less than 2mm wear material on them and arnt capable of stopping much more the tractor so trailer brakes have to be absolutely perfect with them
They also don't have a proportional air break valve on them
It's just one of those things there are better setups than the one pictured
A triaxle helps alot with tractors aswell as you can position the machine better on the trailer and you have more breaking force which is the biggest issue with tractors they don't break nearly aswell as a lorry
 
C

craig

Active member
15 tonne capacity.
19t gross, less 4t of the trailer.
A js145 + hitch + buckets(s) would be tight.
Thinking about this a bit more, A few years back they put the gross train weight up to 31tonne, but the maximum weight of the trailer+load stayed at 18.29 tonne. So that JS145 and a 4 tonne trailer, it would be over.
But this then leads into the same arguments, tandem v`s tri axle as 3500kgs trailers, looking at @Monkeybusiness trailer plate, is about as good as it gets in keeping the weights legal, a tri axle would eat into the payload.
 
GazCro

GazCro

Well-known member
Thinking about this a bit more, A few years back they put the gross train weight up to 31tonne, but the maximum weight of the trailer+load stayed at 18.29 tonne. So that JS145 and a 4 tonne trailer, it would be over.
But this then leads into the same arguments, tandem v`s tri axle as 3500kgs trailers, looking at @Monkeybusiness trailer plate, is about as good as it gets in keeping the weights legal, a tri axle would eat into the payload.
The 18.29 limit is for red diesel
 
JD450A

JD450A

Feral as Fk
Isn't the while thing about mindset?
As in "wagons are complex to run and require loads of paperwork" where as run your tractor from a farm...run on red and that's it no hassle etc mentality? That's what prevails round here... 🤷
Bingo.....

Lorries are a twat to run and keep "roadworthy" the penalty's for minor deficiencies are horrific and the paperwork is a twat.

As Demonstrated tractors are easy, require little if any additional qualifications, require minimal paperwork and just need tax and insurance..... Is it Unroadworthy? don't worry plead ignorance and you will get a insignificant fine.....

Until Either running a Lorry for own use is deregulated, Or tractors are heavily regulated this will go on! Personal opinion as stated before is a combination! De Regulate lorries under 18t for own goods use (restricted) but double the Testing regime (to one every six months).... that goes for all lorries without a O license, horseboxes and private wagons too!

FYI you can run a tractor legally..... White Diesel, O license and HGV 1 (C+E) Driver.

The 18.29t limit is the legal limit for a agricultural tractor regardless of it's fuel source. You can go above that if taxed as a specialist vehicle But it must say the limit on the V5/Documents and likewise you need to adere to UK HGV/C&D Axle weights which few agri trailers/tractors would!

Also Legal hitch weight on a tractor is 3.5t from memory....
 
C

craig

Active member
Bingo.....

Lorries are a twat to run and keep "roadworthy" the penalty's for minor deficiencies are horrific and the paperwork is a twat.

As Demonstrated tractors are easy, require little if any additional qualifications, require minimal paperwork and just need tax and insurance..... Is it Unroadworthy? don't worry plead ignorance and you will get a insignificant fine.....

Until Either running a Lorry for own use is deregulated, Or tractors are heavily regulated this will go on! Personal opinion as stated before is a combination! De Regulate lorries under 18t for own goods use (restricted) but double the Testing regime (to one every six months).... that goes for all lorries without a O license, horseboxes and private wagons too!

FYI you can run a tractor legally..... White Diesel, O license and HGV 1 (C+E) Driver.

The 18.29t limit is the legal limit for a agricultural tractor regardless of it's fuel source. You can go above that if taxed as a specialist vehicle But it must say the limit on the V5/Documents and likewise you need to adere to UK HGV/C&D Axle weights which few agri trailers/tractors would!

Also Legal hitch weight on a tractor is 3.5t from memory....
Also if capable of more than 40km/h tested as well.


5. Roadworthiness testing
Tractors that are used solely for agriculture, horticulture or forestry (ie tractors eligible to be taxed in the agricultural tax class) are exempt from roadworthiness testing.

From 20 May 2018, tractors taxed in any other tax class (ie not agricultural) will be required to hold a valid goods vehicle testing certificate if they:

  • are capable by construction of exceeding 40 km/h per hour (approximately 25 mph)
  • are used to haul goods (of any description) more than 15 miles from their operating base (which is not necessarily where they are registered)
Note: this applies to tractors which are capable of exceeding 40 km/h, even if they are not permitted to exceed 40 km/h (see section 2). You should consult the manufacturer if you are not sure whether your tractor is capable of exceeding 40 km/h.

Tractor testing is part of the goods vehicle testing regime, operated by DVSA. Tractors requiring testing must have their first test 4 years after first registration, and a further test every 2 years after that. At test, tractors will be expected to meet the higher construction standards of tractors that may travel above 40 km/h (see section 2). If a trailer is not used solely for an agricultural, horticulture or forestry purpose it is not exempt from goods vehicle testing, even if towed by a tractor (see part 1).
 
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