Welding a hydraulic pump shaft

R

Russell

Active member
Has anyone welded a drive coupling to a hydraulic pump shaft? Did it bigger the pump? The spline on the drive coupling is very worn, the spline on the pump is also worn. I'm thinking if I drill a hole through the coupling and fill with weld and weld it through the hole the engine shaft goes in. I'm just not sure if the heat will kill the pump. I could use chemical metal but might not be as strong.
 
Quattromike

Quattromike

Well member-known
You could be on a hiding to nothing there.. hydraulic pumps have super high tolerances so any distortion would knnackker it. If the welding didn't go the seals. Is it a throw away item or prime mover your sorting up?
 
S

Smiffy

Well-known member
Seeing as you are drilling holes in the coupling you could try tapping them and putting a grub screw in
Or drill the hole fit the coupling put a drill bit in the hole with a very shallow grind on it then tap and fit grub screws
I don't know the design of the coupling but either a row of screws down one line or at intervals around the circumference should give a reasonable grip especially if it's reinforcing an existing spline even if the spline is worn
 
R

Russell

Active member
Good point I didn't think about grub screws although wouldn't the pump shaft be hardened? Ultimately it needs a new pump and engine so not to worried if it kills it but it would be nice to get a few more jobs out of it
 
C

Canal Navvy

Active member
Pump shaft will be proper hard , way too hard to indent with any drill I've ever met.

It's pretty easy to effect a temporary repair to keep going until the parts arrive using epoxy resin , though in my experience the new part turns out to be a new machine.

If my little Terex Schaeff had a similar problem I'd try using using the sort of resin that windscreen fitters use
 
V8Druid

V8Druid

do it as well as you can,but learn to do it better
Pump shaft will be proper hard , way too hard to indent with any drill I've ever met.

It's pretty easy to effect a temporary repair to keep going until the parts arrive using epoxy resin , though in my experience the new part turns out to be a new machine.

If my little Terex Schaeff had a similar problem I'd try using using the sort of resin that windscreen fitters use
Belzona, Devcon, JB Weld or Araldite plastic metal .. all would do a fair job ...... provided everything was perfectly aligned before application ..... and allowd plenty of setting time
 
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