Spark arrestor

T whiting

T whiting

Well-known member
Does anyone have experience with spark arrestors?

I've been asked to do some work at a petroleum plant and they have asked for one to be fitted
 
Charlie

Charlie

Well-known member
Ye, normally just a bit of stainless mesh inline in the exhaust that stops the glowing carbon bits getting out. I insist on them being used around the explosive store in hot summers. Is there anyone from the states here? I believe they are quite common out there and law in some states. There are also more complicated ones for larger commercial engines I believe.
 
T whiting

T whiting

Well-known member
Yes this would to be to go on my duck though I did read somewhere that a turbocharger counts as a spark arrestor but I don't know how far is get with that arguement
 
Charlie

Charlie

Well-known member
Well I never @T whiting , in the Sates they are. Never knew that.

Turbochargers qualify as effective spark arresters when 100% of the exhaust gasses pass through the turbine wheel. The turbine wheel must be turning at all times and there must be no exhaust bypass to the atmosphere. Depending on design, small enclosed system bypasses that reroute some exhaust back through the engine may be allowed. The illustration of the exhaust-driven turbocharger shows the air intake and the exhaust path through the turbine wheel. The action of the rotating turbine wheel causes carbon particles to remain within the confines of the turbo-drive section until they are reduced to a harmless size by attrition.

 
V8Druid

V8Druid

do it as well as you can,but learn to do it better
used to have to have 'em on the ordnance sites on the cranes .. as Charlie says fine S/steel mesh over the exhaust exit used to placate 'em .... clamped onto the stacks, on arrival at the gate ... sod hauling it down there with 'em in place :rolleyes:
 
D

DaveDCB

Well-known member
Check your insurance too Tom, mine have started adding loads of exclusions these days! They’d have a paddy if they found out some of the places I’ve worked in the past 🤯
 
maz

maz

Well-known member
I had to do a safety course for working on petrol forecourts about 15 years ago, they told us to assume that there is a constant invisible fog of fumes knee high and its very ignitable...:oops: then they showed us videos of roofers torching next to the tank vent pipes 🔥. They were fussy about the brushed motors in impact drills and tools as well because of the sparks...it got to the point where you were only allowed to use cave man tools. After 8 hours of H&S videos of petrol stations blowing up, I didn't really fancy working on them anymore.
 
D

DaveDCB

Well-known member
We were on a live forecourt with 3cx and breaker smashing out half the old pumps to be replaced while the other ones were still live… probably won’t do that again 🤯 (not my job, just day rate subcontractor)
 
Danny

Danny

Well-known member
I priced one back along and think it was around £1.5- 2k fully fitted.

I put it back to the client one of my ( geo tech ) clients and haven't heard a dicky bird since
 
V8Druid

V8Druid

do it as well as you can,but learn to do it better
I priced one back along and think it was around £1.5- 2k fully fitted.

I put it back to the client one of my ( geo tech ) clients and haven't heard a dicky bird since
Well I never @T whiting , in the Sates they are. Never knew that.

Turbochargers qualify as effective spark arresters when 100% of the exhaust gasses pass through the turbine wheel. The turbine wheel must be turning at all times and there must be no exhaust bypass to the atmosphere. Depending on design, small enclosed system bypasses that reroute some exhaust back through the engine may be allowed. The illustration of the exhaust-driven turbocharger shows the air intake and the exhaust path through the turbine wheel. The action of the rotating turbine wheel causes carbon particles to remain within the confines of the turbo-drive section until they are reduced to a harmless size by attrition.

 
Gecko

Gecko

Well-known member
I doubt you could buy a tractor in Oz without a spark arrestor, but a turbo is also acceptable here too.
 
T whiting

T whiting

Well-known member
Thanks guys theres been some more news on the job spark arrestors aren't required but we just can't have petrol tools/make sparks which doesn't sound too bad we just need to work out a way of cutting rebar that ideally doesn't involve bolt croppers 🥵
 
V8Druid

V8Druid

do it as well as you can,but learn to do it better
Thanks guys theres been some more news on the job spark arrestors aren't required but we just can't have petrol tools/make sparks which doesn't sound too bad we just need to work out a way of cutting rebar that ideally doesn't involve bolt croppers 🥵
can of freeze and a sharp cold chisel or one of these
1656078535454.png

1656078574814.png

couldn't find what I was looking for :(
1656078807780.png

can get much smaller versions -
1656078932382.png

I have one smaller still

... but these'd do the job

can't find a UK made one -- IIRC Ficep used to do one
 
S

Smiffy

Well-known member
Thanks guys theres been some more news on the job spark arrestors aren't required but we just can't have petrol tools/make sparks which doesn't sound too bad we just need to work out a way of cutting rebar that ideally doesn't involve bolt croppers 🥵

Milwaukee do an electric shear for threaded rod so should work on rebar to providing it fits
 
1RB

1RB

Active member
Battery powered jaws of life would cut a bit of rebar.

When these things get into the wrong hands there won’t be a shipping container safe in the country

D2C7CAF6-01EB-4BF3-8D73-948E1C64A125.jpeg
 
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