How much do you charge for yer pecker?

Routy56

Routy56

Well-known member
As the title says - I've had an Arrowhead S20 for just over a year now
It's for a 1.5 to 3T machine but performs well on my Neuson :cool:
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Bought it second hand and put it into Nigel @Dr pecker for repairs and new headstock etc.
Not cheap but very pleased with it's performance for the past year or so :)

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Then a few weeks ago it lost it's nitrogen :eek:
Nigel said, "Yeah those Arrowheads do that, bring it over and we'll sort it out"

So with a new point this Arrowhead now stand me in at over £2k :(

When I go out with my mini, I sometimes get asked, "Have you got a pecker?"
And I add a bit on my day rate......

So guys, what would be a reasonable amount to charge for me rocking up with my pecker? :unsure:
 
Furniss

Furniss

Well-known member
Not so much the cost of the pecker as the the fact you have to sit on it and bang and clatter both you and your machine.

Wants to be £50 a day if your using it in anger 🤷‍♂️
 
Left hooker

Left hooker

Well-known member
We used to do it as so much per hour but was a ball ache to keep track of so nominal charge for the day whether it's 10 mins or all day
Used mine today as still had it on beaver tail lorry from last week was glad as well as wall didn't want to come down in a hurry not surprising as it was built out of old 9inch concrete blocks 😳
 
Routy56

Routy56

Well-known member
Guys thanks for your suggestions so far(y)
As usual when starting anything 'new' I am way too cheap.
Like Rory's @JD450A suggestion about X hiring a machine to run the pecker :cool:
Gonna have to get business like and ask myself, "Do I really want a pecker shaking my machine to bits for a few extra quid" :eek:
That said, for occasional use it really does get the job done.
Now the trick is to get it to pay for itself ;)
 
GazCro

GazCro

Well-known member
Guys thanks for your suggestions so far(y)
As usual when starting anything 'new' I am way too cheap.
Like Rory's @JD450A suggestion about X hiring a machine to run the pecker :cool:
Gonna have to get business like and ask myself, "Do I really want a pecker shaking my machine to bits for a few extra quid" :eek:
That said, for occasional use it really does get the job done.
Now the trick is to get it to pay for itself ;)
It's a bit of swings and roundabouts regarding machine wear imho. For long periods of use then it's certainly a consideration. Most pecker work i do is 15/20 mins to knock a conc path or garage base up etc. Often you can do these tasks with ripper or toothed bucket then either drop conc to break it up or try using ur bucket as a hanmer to smash it. Imho pecker is often kinder to machine than riving at stuff, just make sure you add a bit on.
 
Dr pecker

Dr pecker

Active member
Guys thanks for your suggestions so far(y)
As usual when starting anything 'new' I am way too cheap.
Like Rory's @JD450A suggestion about X hiring a machine to run the pecker :cool:
Gonna have to get business like and ask myself, "Do I really want a pecker shaking my machine to bits for a few extra quid" :eek:
That said, for occasional use it really does get the job done.
Now the trick is to get it to pay for itself ;)
Only problem with x hiring Dave is that its unlikely your breaker will fit the digger (32mm pins remember).
 
Routy56

Routy56

Well-known member
It's a bit of swings and roundabouts regarding machine wear imho. For long periods of use then it's certainly a consideration. Most pecker work i do is 15/20 mins to knock a conc path or garage base up etc. Often you can do these tasks with ripper or toothed bucket then either drop conc to break it up or try using ur bucket as a hanmer to smash it. Imho pecker is often kinder to machine than riving at stuff, just make sure you add a bit on.
Yes you make good points. All the breaking stuff out without a pecker I’ve done 😉
But if I factor it in for any breaking out no matter how small then it gets used and pays for itself 🤠
 
Routy56

Routy56

Well-known member
I only ever seem to need it for half an hour a day, and it fits all three of my machines. I charge £50, if it was all day then I'd up it.

Bought new from JB Equipment, around £1750 ex VAT IIRC.
Yes good point - I’ll factor it on for ANY breaking out and charge at least £50 a day to have it available 🤠
 
GazCro

GazCro

Well-known member
Yes you make good points. All the breaking stuff out without a pecker I’ve done 😉
But if I factor it in for any breaking out no matter how small then it gets used and pays for itself 🤠
The other thing to factor in is what's under what you're taking up. You can take a slab of conc up more delicately by pecking it to bits sometimes than just pulling the whole slab up and whatever is stuck to the underside
 
S

Steve

Active member
I only ever seem to need it for half an hour a day, and it fits all three of my machines. I charge £50, if it was all day then I'd up it.

Bought new from JB Equipment, around £1750 ex VAT IIRC.
I think this is sound advice. There is a big difference between charging a regular customer £50 extra for the convenience of the breaker doing the odd half hour & a non regular customer thinking you are coming in pecking hard reinforced concrete all day then going back to there regular contractor the following day when it is day digging.
 
A

AusDave

Member
I used to use a pecker for a lot of concrete work until I had to remove a large reinforced house slab which had edges up to 300mm thick :oops: I found a local guy who did concrete cutting and had a large range of equipment from hand held saws to road saws which cut 300mm + deep. He quoted a per metre rate and I told him the size of slabs I could handle and he cut the slab into the required sizes in just a few hours.

All I had to do then was load the evenly sized slabs on the truck which fitted nicely, being all rectangular, and take them to the recyclers. (That was the intention anyway.) The cutting cost was way cheaper and faster than using a pecker, no wearing out my machine, loading into the truck was fast and easy and there was virtually nothing in the way of lumps of concrete to clean up. Also not being my saw I didn't have to clean and maintain it either :)

The flaw in my quote for this job wasn't the method using the saw, that worked out great. It was the fact that until I grabbed the cut lumps of concrete I wasn't aware that the slab was recent and used the waffle pod method with big styrene foam pods under the concrete. This didn't occur to me to be a problem until I dumped the concrete at the recyclers. As soon as they hit the dirt recycling guy came running over and told me to stop. He said they can't take any concrete contaminated with styrene as it's a pollutant and blows all over their site and raises the ire of the authorities big time. They promptly brought over a loader and put all the contaminated concrete back in my truck and told me to take it to the local landfill site.

This I duly did and paid over $300 per tonne to dump it in the landfill as if it was asbestos waste! Fortunately the slabs former owner understood the situation and paid for the disposal costs. Won't be making that mistake again!
But anyway if you've got a fair amount of concrete to remove and it's in reinforced slabs check out the price of getting it cut into reasonable sizes, it may make you money :D
 
Gunners

Gunners

Well-known member
I've done the cutting up method before, especially internally it works quite well. drilled and fixed an expanding bolt lifting eye into each piece to lift them out. Very clean, minimal mess and quick too.
For once I am in agreement with Doobin and Gazcro, for the kind of work you do Routy, its not going to damage your machine as you wont use it long enough and at £50 extra for getting your pecker out 😉 , even for 10 mins, its good value for the customer and worth owning for you. Wacker plates, disc cutters and cat and gennys are also good ways of topping up the rate for the smaller owner op out there. Or in my case, justifying a higher rate than the competition. Very little overhead for a better return.
If the job needs all day hammering then you can come up with a rate to suit, or hire in if you are really worried about it. Machines are pretty tough and providing you keep up the greasing you wont do too much damage to the machine. Theres more damage to be done by using the pecker as a leaver or running it when its not engaged with anything. Used properly they are a great tool even on micro diggers and far better than being stood over a beaver pack!
 
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