Crane thing

diggerjones

diggerjones

Active member
Likes
187
#2
Took this in Majorca in feb this year. Thought it may be interest to some
 
V8Druid

V8Druid

do it as well as you can,but learn to do it better
Likes
1,525
#3
artic unit with a demountable body on the 5th wheel ? @Mogman 'd know probably ....... helluva crane on it. :oops:
 
Adam

Adam

New member
Likes
14
#7
I thought the legs were to help get the axle weights right when dvsa have you on the scales. 😁
 
V8Druid

V8Druid

do it as well as you can,but learn to do it better
Likes
1,525
#8
I wonder Why do they call them Chinese 6
good Q Dylan (y).... I have no idea, but always known 'em as a Chinese six :unsure:.... four steering, two driving wheels. ..... The breweries used to use them on dray work a lot, to get the loading capacity (y)
 
pettsy

pettsy

Active member
Likes
178
#9
I wonder Why do they call them Chinese 6
A couple of thoughts on trucknet

gnasty gnome wrote:
I'd guess that it originates as a vernacular way of describing anything that was "back to front" in the 1920's/30's, when that type of vehicle was first built.


“This to my knowledge is accurate. Back then the "wrong" way of doing things was the "chinese" way . They just looked wrong with 2 axles at the front and 1 at the rear? My view is that perhaps they were trying to get away from the tendancy of the conventional sixes to go in a straight line,no matter what you did with the wheel! :eek:
Incidentally my first sighting of a chinese six was a dray out of Hunton Bridge, Ind Coope I beleive. So I know breweries used them, but cant recall them on general haulage.
 
Quattromike

Quattromike

Active member
Likes
225
#11
Service Control On Wagon
Slew Crane On Wheels
Safety Cab opens Well
😁 I dunno.
 
V8Druid

V8Druid

do it as well as you can,but learn to do it better
Likes
1,525
#14
scoff has it in one (y) ...... the name comes from a type of boat with an 'upswept' stern (and bow usually) ... load bearing/cargo type vessels with flat bottoms and the upswept ends, for shore clearance and riding outgoing tides to best advantage. A river punt is a good example of a scow backed vessel ;)
 
TiltyShaun

TiltyShaun

Well-known member
Likes
310
#18
Again I am now kicking myself for not taking a photo. Had a truck onsite on Thursday from Foundation Piling. He had a rather monster Hiab that can reach 16m with 3ton on the end. Up close lift of 11ton. Will hopefully get some pics when he comes to pick the stuff up!!
 
P

powercom

New member
Likes
22
#19
A couple of thoughts on trucknet

gnasty gnome wrote:
I'd guess that it originates as a vernacular way of describing anything that was "back to front" in the 1920's/30's, when that type of vehicle was first built.


“This to my knowledge is accurate. Back then the "wrong" way of doing things was the "chinese" way . They just looked wrong with 2 axles at the front and 1 at the rear? My view is that perhaps they were trying to get away from the tendancy of the conventional sixes to go in a straight line,no matter what you did with the wheel! :eek:
Incidentally my first sighting of a chinese six was a dray out of Hunton Bridge, Ind Coope I beleive. So I know breweries used them, but cant recall them on general haulage.
That's interesting I remember when i was kid a local 6 wheel tipper truck a maybe it was a dodge that had some sort of I think 2 stroke diesel in it.
Noisy as hell revving its nuts off pulling up a local hill , you didn't need to see it to know who it was.

Whatever it was it was always referred by people who "I assumed knew " as that will be "tommy" in his that Chinese 6 !! Now knowing nothing better I sort of assumed the engine was in some way connected to china , by design , manufacturer or partnership although this was 40 years ago and thinking about it now that was highly unlikely in the late 70's early 80" to have any connection like that but know know better it made some sense back then .
So googling it today comes up with little other than your explanation confirmed that i found on a Mack forum
quote : "While the Brits called them a Chinese Six because there was a time in the UK when anything the opposite of normal was termed Chinese"
However I never heard that phrase used to describe anything else than that truck
 
V8Druid

V8Druid

do it as well as you can,but learn to do it better
Likes
1,525
#20
Iron Fairy Amethyst 15/18 ..... a rare example of a 'Chinese six' set up

1540744264305.png


never seen one in the metal ..... they'm RARE!! :oops: